Experiments with a lower engine bay cover/splitter/snow plow! (2 of 2)

October….Iteration 2.

For a second prototype, I reduced the height and rivetted the parts together in the correct alignment. This looks much better. Also, I painted it black (which makes it very difficult to see in the following photos). While I was at it, I replaced the cardboard oil cooler blocking with aluminum.

Second prototype, shorter, and painted black

Second prototype, shorter, and painted black

New engine bay cover / splitter mounted in place

New engine bay cover / splitter mounted in place

Front view, on the ground. Note the sump

Front view, on the ground. Note the sump

On the ground, side view

On the ground, side view

Aluminum cover, painted black, over the oil cooler to reduce airflow in the winter

Aluminum cover, painted black, over the oil cooler to reduce airflow in the winter

Initial test drive was OK. Need to get a GoPro video made

Advertisements

Experiments with a lower engine bay cover/splitter/snow plow! (1 of 2)

October….
After last months drive in a snowstorm, pushing snow into the engine bay, I decided to do something to mitigate the problem. The objectives were:
1. Prevent snow or other debris getting into the engine bay.
2. Provide some minimal protection for the low-slung sump (2″ to 3″ road clearance)
3. Improve airflow and possibly introduce some downforce.

I first made a cardboard model as shown below:

Cardboard model of splitter

Cardboard model of splitter

Cardboard model of splitter

Cardboard model of splitter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I fabricated this out of aluminum sheet & pop rivets as a first prototype. There are 4 main parts:

Engine bay bottom cover, with raised section to fit around the front of the oil sump

Engine bay bottom cover, with raised section to fit around the front of the oil sump

  1. The engine bay bottom cover
  2. air deflector
  3. air deflector
  4. Bottom plate

As shown in the following pictures.

 

 

 

 

Added middle part as air deflector

Added middle part as air deflector

Added bottom plate

Added bottom plate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fitted to the car – came out lower than planned with only 1’5″ ground clearance. (You can get a good idea how it mounts and what it looks like in-situ. Later in prototype 2 – you can’t see this much detail ‘cos everything’s painted black).

View 1 - mounted to the car, jacked up

View 1 – mounted to the car, jacked up

View 2 - mounted to the car, jacked up

View 2 – mounted to the car, jacked up

View 3 - mounted to the car, jacked up

View 3 – mounted to the car, jacked up

View 4 - mounted to the car, on the ground with 1.5" clearance

View 4 – mounted to the car, on the ground with 1.5″ clearance

View 5 - mounted to the car, on the ground with 1.5" clearance

View 5 – mounted to the car, on the ground with 1.5″ clearance

View 6 - mounted to the car, on the ground with 1.5" clearance

View 6 – mounted to the car, on the ground with 1.5″ clearance


 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
The initial test drive was successful, including a GoPro video. But more spirited driving later had some scraping on the road as the suspension bottomed.

Heater static test

Friday.
Did a static test with the engine idling to check hose temperatures.
Engine came up to temperature (88C) after 20 minutes idling at 1250rpm (bottom radiator hose warm) and 5 minutes later the radiator fan kicked in & started cycling. This was the steady state.

The in and out hoses to the heater switch were both hot, the top hose from the heater was sightly warm, the bottom hose to the heater was cold. This is correct.

I opened the heater switch to fully open. Within 7 minutes the indicated temperature had dropped from 90C to 75C. Radiator fan continued to cycle on and off. The in and out hoses to the heater switch from the engine were noticeably cooler. The bottom hose to the heater remained cold. Conclusion, no coolant is flowing through the hoses due to a heater switch effectively closing.

Apparently, the switch is actually closing rather than diverting coolant to the heater core, or the heater core itself is blocked.

Next step is to remove the heater switch & check it out.