Gearing Up (day 5)

Tuesday.
I took a day vacation from work to make some progress on the car.
First, I cleaned up any excess sealant from yesterday’s sump install, then turned the engine upright and installed the fuel rail and thermostat & housing.

Engine & fuel rail

Engine & fuel rail

Now, the gearbox and bellhousing mating surfaces both have threaded holes – so one must go. The gearbox is steel and the bell-housing is aluminum – so easy choice.

Drilling the Bell-housing

Drilling the Bell-housing

Drilling the Bell-housing

Drilling the Bell-housing

Next was to bolt the bell housing to the gearbox.

Gearbox & Bell-housing bolted together

Gearbox & Bell-housing bolted together

I installed the clutch slave cylinder. note that the bleed nipple and the hex for the wrench are both inside the oval hole that exits the bell housing. So no way to get on a regular wrench to bleed the clutch.

Clutch slave cylinder

Clutch slave cylinder

I had to come up with a special tool to get both a plastic tube on and be able to open and close the valve. I found that those 4 in 1 screwdrivers use a 5/16″ tubular socket to hold the screwdriver bits. So I bought one and ground out a hole in the side – looks like it should work.

In practice, there is not enough leverage using the special tool by its handle, so, first slacken off the bleed nipple with a 5/16″ long reach socket, then install the tube & special tool. Bleed the clutch as normal. When finished, remove the tool & tube and re-tighten with the 5/16″ long reach socket.

Special tool inserted over bleed tube

Special tool inserted over bleed tube

Bleed tool in position to open/close bleed nipple

Bleed tool in position to open/close bleed nipple

I cleaned up the flywheel and pressure plate with alcohol and did a test fit with the clutch in the bell housing -seems to fit OK.

Attached rubber mount to the bottom of the gearbox.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
I had decided not to mate the gearbox with the engine and install both together, rather I am planning to install the gear box first and the engine later. I had made a comment about seeing a recommendation to do this in a way earlier post.

In retrospect, this was a mistake and I would recommend mating the engine/gearbox out of the car. There is very little room inside the car to make a good alignment.

So, I hoisted the gearbox with the engine hoist using a climbing sling – which was convenient. Lowered the gearbox down and greased up both the prop shaft and the gearbox splines. It went in fairly easily, I had to use a spring clamp to hold the gearbox close to the mounting point, while I got up to lower it down another inch or two. Then finally held in place by inserting the two chassis bolts & nuts.

Gearbox hanging from engine hoist

Gearbox hanging from engine hoist

Lowering in the gearbox

Lowering in the gearbox

Getting there

Getting there

 

 

In position

In position

Gearbox to prop shaft

Gearbox to prop shaft

I removed the gearbox side filler allen bolt (see earlier post for special wrench to use), opened the top filler cap and poured in 1 and 1/3 quarts of oil before it started dripping out the side hole. Closed both filler caps.

Fill up

Fill up

Connected the clutch hydraulic pipe to the master cylinder.

When I built the front suspension, I had omitted to install a spacer that is needed on wide track suspension cars (but not on normal cars). So I undid the two front lower uprights, installed the spacers, screwed on the modified nylock nuts and torqued them up.

Installed the gear shift.

Gear shift

Gear shift

Back to the engine

Bolted many new items onto the engine block:
-EGR blanking plate;
-Spark plugs;
-Fitted sender to coolant outlet (had to use a vice), then bolted the coolant outlet to the engine;
-Fitted the hose from coolant outlet to water pump bypass connector;
-Cam position sensor onto valve cover;
-Alternator brackets & alternator;
-Water thermostat;
-Left & right engine mounts;
-Lower tensioner & bracket;
-Upper RH tensioner;
-Air intake plenum;
-Dipstick outlet screw.

Engine with EGR blanking plate, coolant outlet, coolant by-pass hose

Engine with EGR blanking plate, coolant outlet, coolant by-pass hose

Cam position sensor

Cam position sensor

Temp sender mounted in coolant outlet plastic casting.

Temp sender mounted in coolant outlet plastic casting.
Belt won't go on

Belt won’t go on

Plenum mounted on engine

Plenum mounted on engine


Note this following picture – it shows the hose connecting the PCV valve on the top of the oil separator to the bottom of the plenum. This is important as it is the one thing they inspect for in the BAR inspection.
PCV hose from plenum to PCV valve

PCV hose from plenum to PCV valve

Mismatched plug on wiring harness to fit the temp sender socker

Mismatched plug on wiring harness to fit the temp sender socker

Engine on stand, pretty much ready

Engine on stand, pretty much ready

Installed the window washer bottle, tube & spray head, took 45 minutes lying in the car on my back with my head under the dashboard & feet on the roll over bar -> most of the time was to climb out 😀

After dinner, Alex & I went out to bleed the brakes & clutch. Fixed a few leaky connections and bled each brake 3 times in a round-robin until no air bubbles left. Now we have a brake pedal. Next the clutch – took a while to get it started – air lock, I think. But got it in the end. The slave cylinder actuates about 3/4″, don’t know if that’s OK until we get the engine & clutch in.

That being done, we called it a night.

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